TSQL Tuesday #96: Folks Who Have Made a Difference

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This month’s T-SQL Tuesday, hosted by ewald, touches on the people who have made a positive difference in our journeys in the SQL Server world. Please pardon if you’re reading this and feel left out – that’s not my intention. There are so many people who’ve made a difference for me along the way that it’s hard to list them all.

My first shout-out goes to the folk I worked with way back when I was just starting out. I worked for a company just coming out of start-up mode with SQL Server 4.21a.  The first time I heard of “sequel” server had me scratching my head until I saw the posters around for “SQL” Server. I was given an opportunity to learn, mostly through BOL, SQL Server and become an MCSE through much studying and some horrible exams. I discovered that I kind of liked this database thing and learned more, got better at my TSQL, and learned where to ask questions from the people who were really involved in the product.

I owe a huge debt to the folk who regularly participated in the old “microsoft.sqlserver” USENET groups. I could search through those posts for people with similar problems to what I was trying to solve, or just interesting questions. I would find out pretty quickly about major bugs (anyone remember SQL 6.5 SP2 and SP4?).  Regulars there such as Joe Celko, Steve Jones, Andy Warren, Andy Leonard, and Jamie Thomson would all respond pretty quickly and often provide additional food for thought.  I could follow along with people wanting to argue with Mr. Celko about proper ANSI SQL – usually good for some amusement. I could learn some interesting tips for making DTS jump through the hoops necessary to move data around.  One thing I learned from those USENET groups is they were vastly different from other tech groups at the time. If I asked a question in those forums, I got a real response – not just a terse “RTM and go away” that I saw so often in other forums. I knew that the SQL Community was much more welcoming than other groups at the time and that was quite attractive.

I have to give a shout-out to co-workers along the way who challenged me and let me bounce ideas off of them, as well as for sharing a laugh when the situation didn’t really call for laughing. Jeff Rush, Mark Hill, Nick Floyd, and many of the people from Fellowship Tech, several along the way from First City/Drive/Santander, and many at my current gig at Healthwise.  I appreciate the desire to follow through, think of new ways to solve problems, and do all sorts of cool things along the way to increase our efficiency by spending less time on “keeping the lights on”. As an admitted “lazy DBA”, I can definitely appreciate time spent doing meaningful work instead of busywork.

The people in the SQL Community – many of whom I have not met face to face, but chat with in the Slack forums.  There are just too many to mention here, but I appreciate the regulars who share a joke, a neat way of doing things, ask questions that make me think, or answer questions I have because they’ve been there already.  If you’re in the Slack community – you’re likely in this group. Thank you. I appreciate you all taking part not just in general chit-chat, which is fun, but in helping everyone grow in their skills.

The folk in the PASS Prayers group. As a Christian, it’s great to have a group of people who will pray for each other. Yes, we have that in our local communities, but it’s great to have a group of people who share the same types of career and can join together with a bit more understanding about our day-to-day struggles. It’s also great to meet up with them when I actually get to attend the Summit.  Thanks to Mike Walsh and others for getting us all together.

I know there are groups that I’m leaving out and that’s because there are so many people who’ve been helpful in this journey. Thanks for taking the time to walk with me or guide me. I hope that I can provide that same assistance to others along the way.  And a hat-tip to Ewald Cress for a timely TSQL Tuesday Topic.

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